Travelogues

Triund Trek: Hobnobbing with the Himalayas

Triund Trek (1)

Trekking has always been one of those activities that my non-pathetic alter ego has yearned for. But but rarely does it get an opportunity to indulge in the same. The regular readers will be aware of the first ever trek of any value or consequence done for this blog, the Valley of Flowers.

After more than two years, I was again back in the Himalayas and as I’d mentioned in the previous post, McLeod Ganj spoiled us with food. So, to overcome the socialist guilt of excessive consumption, I decided to undertake the Triund Trek the next day along with Su Ko who has always been a bigger sinner of gluttony.

We did have a bigger than usual breakfast at the hotel in McLeod Ganj but I think it was fair because we were going to have a tough time. We first moved from McLeod Ganj to Dharamkot by hiring an auto rickshaw. It is a smaller settlement barely a couple of KMs away and it is better to take some vehicle to this point to save time. At this point, the real trek starts and it is 7KMs from here to the peak of Triund, a distance I rarely walk at one go even on the plains.

The first few yards of the trek are not that difficult. The ambiance was not lush green like the monsoons but had a more demure green look with occasional reddish hues of the autumn. The moon was visible even in the broad day light due to the clear and unpolluted sky.

Triund Trek (2)

Triund Trek (3)

We occasionally came across other trekkers, small settlements and mini caravans of the locals with solitary donkeys.

Triund Trek (4)

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One particular view was especially attracting my attention. It was a small plot of terrace cultivation that could be seen from a distance. There was also a steep trail leading towards it and there was also a small hut and I wondered how great it would be to live such a secluded existence. As we moved on, that particular plot kept becoming clearer and after a couple of tiring hours, I suddenly noticed that we’ve reached a higher spot than the plot in question.

Triund Trek (5)

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The progress was slow and tedious. Years of lethargic urban lifestyle was showing its colours. The sun was warm but the shades were chilly and the lone water bottle was quickly getting empty. But with every turn the Dhauladhars became clearer with vibrant fall colours.

Triund Trek (8)

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The last stretch was becoming more and more tedious especially for me as it was the longest trek I had ever done. As we were about to reach the top, suddenly the weather did a volte-face. Suddenly there was a light drizzle and thick fog all over. Not that I dislike rain but the view was completely blurred and practically blocked. When we finally made it to the Triund top, all we could see was small shacks selling food, a few dogs, some other trekkers having lunch at the edge of what looked like a foggy abyss.

Triund Trek (20)

Triund Trek (14)

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From Triund it is possible to move higher up to certain other locations and in fact it is one of the ancient routes connecting Kangra with Chamba. But the popular day trek for dummies is supposed to end here itself. We were tired, famished and sleepy. We asked one of the shopkeepers if we can get anything to eat, he offered us Maggi and Gatorade and we eagerly lapped up this triumph of globalization. We waited for an hour but the fog refused to go away and so the pseudo aerial shots that I fantasized about were never possible.

Triund Trek (17)

While coming down I suddenly saw a goat. After a few steps, I saw a couple more and finally I noticed an entire herd of mountain goats. I always knew that the goats are capable of good balancing acts. The first ever circus I ever visited during my childhood had a goat walking on wire. But it was impressive seeing so many of them swarming the steep mountain and soon I realized that they were not alone. There was a shepherd guiding them but we only heard his voice. But we did see a shepherd dog keeping a close eye on them. I must confess that this was the most stately dog I have even seen in my life.

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While coming back, we stopped for tea at the midpoint. There was a small house cum shop and also a small temple. There we found a lonely British guy who called himself Garry. Apparently he has been coming to India for almost a couple of decades. He works for a few months, saves money and rushes to India. And he was planning to spend that night at that shack in the midst of nowhere. This is how the mountains seduce people! Anyways, the last leg of the trek was event less and I just got a few photographs clicked with silly poses to be used as display pics in various social media profiles.

Triund Trek (25)

The Dharamshala sojourn ends basically with this trek. The next day we moved to Chamba. But that’s another story.

Triund Trek: Traveller FAQs

How long is the Trek?


Triund is around 9 kms form McLeod Ganj. You can save time by hiring an auto rickshaw to Dharamkot and then trekking the final 7 kms.

How much time does it take?


Ascent should take 4-5 hours depending on your physical ability. Descent will be faster. In any case you will have to spend one whole day. Start early in the morning and try to come back before it’s too dark to be in the safer side.

What are the prerequisites for the trek?


It is one of the moderate treks you will find in the Himalayas. But if you are not a regular trekker, make sure that you’re physically fit enough. Also carry warm cloths and water with you. You will also find food and woollens in the shacks at the top.

Best time for Triund Trek


It can be done throughout the year. But the exreme winter will be more challenging with low temperature and fog. We did it during early November and it was pretty comfortable.

Guides for Triund Trek


We did not recruit any guides and in general you can do without one. But if you must take one just inquire the travel agents in McLeod Ganj.

The Triund Trek: Hobnobbing with the Himalayas by The Travelling Slacker, unless otherwise expressly stated, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

11 Comments

  • 2013/03/10 - 6:34 pm | Permalink

    Amazing post. Beautiful photos.

  • 2013/05/08 - 8:26 pm | Permalink

    Lovely Images.

    I have been to Mcleo and Dharamkot two time, this time I am planning to trek Triund in this may month and I am alone. Can you tell me from your experience would it be safe to trek Triund alone?

    • 2013/05/08 - 8:51 pm | Permalink

      Thanks for dropping by… it should be fine even if you go alone if you are physically fit… it gets a bit hectic towards the last few yards… carry some water…

  • 2013/06/15 - 11:55 am | Permalink

    Very good post. I myself visited Triund and trekked further ahead to Ilaqa Snow line. It was an awesome experience. Your photos look terrific especially the clear sky. When I visited it was overcast and bit gloomy an absolute nightmare for photography. I liked your formatting especially the FAQs and will definitely imbibe it in my forthcoming travelogues including Triund with your kind permission :-) Of course I won’t copy the content and anyway I started from Naddi.

  • 2013/07/17 - 4:43 pm | Permalink

    Hey! How about trekking at this time? Do you think monsoons will ruin t or what? Are there any arrangements to stay uphill?

    • 2013/07/17 - 4:49 pm | Permalink

      Hi,

      I think it is fine… it is one of the easier treks… just get raincoats and shoes with good grip…

      Ideally you can come back from Triund on the same day… but if you want to stay up there, I think there is a Forest guest house and some other private provisions too…

  • Pingback: How not to trek to Indrahar Pass | The Travelling Slacker

  • 2013/12/05 - 4:56 pm | Permalink

    is it possible to stay der in nyt????tents nd all other requirements are acessible???

    • 2013/12/05 - 5:34 pm | Permalink

      Yes Chetan… but you need to contact some tour operators to provide that… although the shop owners at tech top also provide the same.. you can ask them…

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